Now Playing Tracks

Eight ways climate change is making the world more dangerous

greenthepress:

Climate change is making the world more dangerous.

You can see how, in 8 charts: 

  1. Flooding was the leading cause of disaster from 2000-2010
  2. As of 2010, heat waves are one of the leading causes of deaths — they weren’t even registered as a threat in the 70s
  3. Disasters are 5.5 more expensive mostly due to floods
  4. Nearly all of the 8,835 disasters – about 89% - were due to flooding and storms

Read the rest on the Guardian

People’s Climate March San Diego

This September 21, with our future on the line and the world watching, we’ll take a stand to bend the course of history. We’ll take to the streets in solidarity with our friends in New York to demand what we know is within reach: a world with an economy that works for people and the planet; a world safe from the ravages of climate change; a world with good jobs, clean air and water, and healthy communities.

We need everyone on board.
12:30 to 4 PM. Sunday, September 21 in San Diego.

Meet at City Hall, 202 C St., San Diego 92101. March to County Administration Park for a rally. Hundreds of marchers. Huge signs. Music. Inspiring speakers.

The Climate Swerve - NYTimes.com

rjzimmerman:

This is an important commentary, to me. It’s telling me that my “gut” feeling is right: that more people, globally, are realizing that the climate is changing, that we have caused the changes, that these changes threaten not just our way or life, but also the lives of many of us humans, globally, particularly those on the edges. It’s also telling me that more Americans are concluding that we can ignore the voices of the doubters and deniers, and move on without them.

I think September 21 could be a turning point. We’ll see. (I’m polishing up my rose-colored glasses.)

Excerpt:

Americans appear to be undergoing a significant psychological shift in our relation to global warming. I call this shift a climate “swerve,” borrowing the term used recently by the Harvard humanities professor Stephen Greenblatt to describe a major historical change in consciousness that is neither predictable nor orderly.

16 Stunning Images of the Arctic Sunrise Taking Peaceful Action

greenpeaceaustp:

Arctic Sunrise moored to Ice Floe


Great news – after being held for nearly 10 months, our Arctic Sunrise is home! To celebrate this news, we’ve put together 16 stunning images of the Arctic Sunrise in peaceful action.

Last September, the Arctic Sunrise was illegally seized at gunpoint in international waters by Russian commandos after a peaceful protest at Gazprom’s Prirazlomnaya Arctic oil platform in the Pechora Sea. The 28 activists and two freelance journalists onboard were kept for months in jail on spurious charges of piracy and then hooliganism, before finally being granted a Parliamentary amnesty at the end of December last year.

The ship got no such amnesty. Instead she was left unattended and unloved to rust quietly in a corner of the port far away from prying eyes.

Millions of people from around the world spoke out against the illegal imprisonment of the Arctic 30, and the final member of the group has come home!

The Arctic Sunrise should never have been detained in the first place. There was absolutely no justification for her being boarded, seized and kept for so long in Murmansk, not least when the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea ordered her immediate release in November 2013.

This whole affair has been a brazen attempt to intimidate those who believe that drilling for oil in the melting Arctic is reckless and unsafe.

Thank you to all of those who stood with the Arctic 30 and the Arctic Sunrise. Only together will we Save the Arctic. As the world warms and the ice melts this is fast becoming an era defining battle, and we are determined to win it.

Take a look back over the incredible journey the Arctic Sunrise has been on, and let us know – what’s your favourite moment in Arctic Sunrise history?

fb-button-sm tw-sharebutton-sm

The first time Greenpeace came in contact with the Arctic Sunrise, it was actually confronting the ship as the French government was using it to build an air strip through a penguin habitat. Since then it has worked everywhere from within 450 miles of the North Pole, to Antarctica’s Ross Sea, and has navigated both the Congo and the Amazon.

Designed as an icebreaker, its rounded, keelless hull allows it to navigate through sea ice – but also makes life rather interesting in rolling seas. In 1997, The Arctic Sunrise became the first ship to circumnavigate James Ross Island in the Antarctic, a previously impossible journey until a 200m thick ice shelf connecting the island to the Antarctic continent collapsed. This was just one of the many signs of climate change which the Arctic Sunrise has helped document.

16. The ship journeys through the Tongass National Forest en route to Juneau, Alaska.

The Greenpeace thermal Airship A.E. Bates in Juneau, Alaska

15. The Arctic Sunrise traveled to the Dry Tortugas with several teams of independent scientists to conduct a series of scientific research programs to further understand the impacts of both oil and chemical dispersants on the Gulf ecosystem in the aftermath of the BP Deepwater oil spill.

MY Arctic Sunrise in Dry Tortugas

14.  Greenpeace activists from the Arctic Sunrise attach floating devices to the cables of a Spanish fishing trawler, forcing her to haul her nets empty, less than an hour after starting the trawl. The trawler is fishing at 450 meters deep, 170 km off the west coast of Ireland in the north east Atlantic ocean destroying the fish habitats of over exploited stocks.

Action against Trawler in North Atlantic

13. A researcher writes in the dive log of the Dual Deep Worker submarine on an inflatable boat near the Greenpeace ship MY Arctic Sunrise in the Gulf of Mexico after the BP oil spill of 2010.

MY Arctic Sunrise in the Gulf of Mexico

12.  In 1997, The Arctic Sunrise became the first ship to circumnavigate James Ross Island in the Antarctic, a previously impossible journey until a 200 meter thick ice shelf connecting the island to the Antarctic continent collapsed.

ARCTIC SUNRISE at James Ross Island

11. Greenpeace protests against the ship “Front Driver” loaded with 153.000 tons of coal, 15 miles outside Valencia. The “Front Driver” is heading towards Tarragona. The protest is to denounce the Spanish energy policy that still relies heavily in fossil fuels.

Climate Coal Action in Valencia10. Two Greenpeace ships, the Rainbow Warrior and the Arctic Sunrise sail together in the Mediterranean Sea in 2012 to action against the bluefin tuna fishing fleets and to promote marine reserves.

RW and Arctic Sunrise in the Mediterranean9. The crew of the Arctic Sunrise construct a ‘heart, with the flags of the 193 country members of the United Nations on an ice floe north of the Arctic Circle.

8. The ship displays a banner reading “Still Yearning To Breathe Free. Quit Coal” as it passes in front of the Statue of Liberty during the ship’s arrival in New York.

Coal Free Future Tour in New York City

7. The ship’s crew and a team of independent scientists sail to remote northeast Greenland, to study the effects of climate change in the Arctic in 2009.

MY Arctic Sunrise in Greenland6.  Crews of the MY Arctic Sunrise and the MY Esperanza use their bodies to write “Help End Whaling!” on the ice of Antarctica, after completing a two month campaign against the whaling fleet of Japan.

Crews form message with their bodies - Southern Ocean Tour 2005 - Sutton-Hibbert5. Ice accumulates in the strong winds that cross the starboard side of the Arctic Sunrise during a 2011 tour in Norway.

Ice on the Arctic Sunrise4. The ship Arctic Sunrise blocks the path of the smaller Cargill ship containing Amazonian soya to prevent it from exiting in 2006. Cargill is responsible for exporting soya grown in deforested areas of the rainforest where huge areas are destroyed to accommodate agricultural demand.

Arctic Sunrise Blocks Discharge of Amazonian Soya3. Politicians and celebrities board the Arctic Sunrise to say ‘NO’ to Trident and explain why they don’t want the UK to spend up to £76 billion on outdated, unnecessary and dangerous weapons of mass destruction in 2007. The Arctic Sunrise has recently returned from an action at the Faslane nuclear base in Scotland, where it blockaded the port for an entire day in protest at the UK government’s rush to a new generation of nuclear weapons.

MY Arctic Sunrise arrives in London2. The Arctic Sunrise with “SOS” signs held in between two inflatables in front of Sugar Loaf Mountain in Rio de Janerio in 2001.

Arctic Sunrise in Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro City, Brazil during the Americas Stop Pollution Tour.1.  The Greenpeace ship, Arctic Sunrise is towed into Murmansk port by a Russian Coast Guard vessel. The activists onboard are detained with piracy charges for a protest against Arctic oil drilling by Russian company Gazprom in the Pechora Sea. The ‘Arctic 30? include 28 Greenpeace International activists, as well as a freelance photographer and a freelance video

grapher.

Arctic Sunrise Inspected by Russian Authorities

The Arctic Sunrise may be home, but the Arctic still needs your help. Act today – join 5 million Arctic defenders and sign to Save the Arctic: http://ift.tt/1BTdxfK

The post 16 Stunning Images of the Arctic Sunrise Taking Peaceful Action appeared first on Greenpeace Australia Pacific.

greenthepress:

Reusable Bags has a good infographic on the continuing climate change debate (as if it’s debatable). You wont’ believe what the skeptics are saying!Sure, climate change is not only man-made but we have created more than our share of it. The United States alone, with less than 6% of the world’s population, contributes over 25% of the planet’s CO2 pollution. Yet, even with over 2,500 scientists from 130 different countries confirming our role in global warming, we still have deniers.

5 top environmental news stories for the week of Friday, Aug. 22, 2014

greentop5:

1. Study Estimates 100,000 Elephants Killed in Last 3 Years: The continued demand for ivory from China and elsewhere in Asia has led to a dramatic decline in Africa’s elephant populations in the last decade, according to a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Extrapolating from local population estimates, the authors estimated that 100,000 elephants have been killed in the last three years and that, in central Africa, the regional population has declined by 64 percent in the last decade. Read more about this study on National Geographic’s website.

 Reportage photographer Brent Stirton documented the illicit ivory trade, and efforts to combat poachers, in 2011 and 2012. In his resulting story, “God’s Ivory,” Brent vividly illustrated the connection between poaching in Africa and demand for religious and cultural icons made from ivory in Asia.

image

 The largest mass killing of elephants in recent history took place at Bouba Ndjida National Park in North Cameroon close to the Chad and Central African Republic Borders from January through March 2012.

 2. World Wildlife Fund Donors Receive Refund After Western Black Rhino Goes Extinct: Expressing contrition over the organization’s failure to rescue the species from critical endangerment, the World Wildlife Fund reportedly reimbursed $7 million to approximately 11,000 donors this week following the confirmed extinction of the western black rhinoceros. “We regret to inform you that the WWF was not successful in its efforts to ensure the survival of the western black rhino, and in accordance with our nonprofit’s satisfaction policy, we have attached compensation in the full dollar amount of your charitable assistance,” read the letter mailed to thousands of WWF sponsors, which included a cashier’s check refunding all donations.

http://www.theonion.com/articles/world-wildlife-fund-donors-receive-refund-after-we,36734/

 3. Runaway Train: Lac-Mégantic is a stark reminder that the world we live in is full of risk, whether the concern is oil transportation, predatory mortgages, exotic pets, or genetically modified foods. In the face of risk, we turn to regulation—and, to hedge our bets, insurance—for the optimal means of mitigating it; but the way we choose to do this says a good deal about how we view the human condition. See the visual essay in the Walrus by Benoit Aquin

 4. The Harper Government Has Refused to Fill a Position to Oversee the Mining Industry: If you aren’t already familiar, 75 percent of the world’s mining companies are headquartered in Canada. Domestically, mining is a $50 billion a year industry that employs hundreds of thousands of people. The vast majority of the world’s mining capital flows through Toronto Stock Exchange. Canadian mining companies are spending some $130 billion abroad.

Read about Canada’s questionable overseas mining operations and practices in Vice.

 5. Oil sands among riskiest energy plays in the world: Some of the world’s costliest energy projects are in Alberta’s oil sands and some could be cancelled without higher oil prices, according to a new report by a financial think-tank that focuses on climate risk.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/industry-news/energy-and-resources/oil-sands-among-riskiest-energy-plays-in-the-world-report/article20075323/

vive-veg:

Palm oil is a type of edible vegetable oil that is derived from the palm fruit, grown on the African oil palm tree. Oil palms are originally from Western Africa, but can flourish wherever heat and rainfall are abundant. Today, palm oil is grown throughout Africa, Asia, North America, and South America, with 85% of all palm oil globally produced and exported from Indonesia and Malaysia; but most of the time not using sustainable measures.

The industry is linked to major issues such as deforestation, habitat degradation, climate change, animal cruelty and indigenous rights abuses in the countries where it is produced, as the land and forests must be cleared for the development of the oil palm plantations. According to the World Wildlife Fund, an area the equivalent size of 300 football fields of rainforest is cleared each hour to make way for palm oil production. This large-scale deforestation is pushing many species to extinction, and findings show that if nothing changes species like the orangutan could become extinct in the wild within the next 5-10 years, and Sumatran tigers less than 3 years. 

In total, 50 million tons of palm oil is produced annually, supplying over 30% of the world’s vegetable oil production. This single vegetable oil is found in approximately 40-50% of household products in countries such as United States, Canada, Australia and England. Palm oil can be present in a wide variety of products, including: baked goods, confectionery, shampoo, cosmetics, cleaning agents, washing detergents and toothpaste.

Source: Say No To Palm Oil

The world’s first official climate refugees land in New Zealand | Grist

rjzimmerman:

Excerpt:

As of now, climate change and sea level rise are not officially recognized as legitimate causes of displacement by the International Refugee Convention. And while the case of this Tuvalu family’s application featured other circumstances — the family had lived in New Zealand since 2007 and had strong ties to the community — environmental lawyers have watched the situation closely, curious as to the case’s larger implications.

“I do see the decision as being quite significant,” Environmental law expert Vernon Rive told the New Zealand Herald. “But it doesn’t provide an open ticket for people from all the places that are impacted by climate change. It’s still a very stringent test and it requires exceptional circumstances of a humanitarian nature.”

free-leonard-peltier:

Let’s stop feeling so guilty about global warming

Emma Thompson is currently in the Arctic aboard the Greenpeace ship Esperanza. She wrote these words after walking out onto the fragile sea ice for the first time alongside her 14 year old daughter Gaia.

We’re told that it is all our fault, global warming — we want the fuel, we want our cars, and that the oil industry is merely responding to the needs of a greedy public. But that’s simply not fair. Most of us want to live cleaner lives, but our governments don’t make these things easily available.

The changes we need, that the Arctic needs, must come from the top as well as the bottom. We need electric cars to be cheaper and more accessible. We want safer bike lanes in every big city. We want plastic bags to be banned for good. We need governments to stand up to the dirty industries that have for so long funded and controlled them, and to give us all an affordable chance to live our lives in a more sustainable way.

Yes, keep recycling; keep using your own shopping bags, taking transit and using your bike. But also use your voice. Know that you have power and you can make your government listen. Above all, I hope that people stop feeling so guilty and powerless about climate change. That’s the lie that keeps us paralysed when really together, we are so much more powerful.

But bear in mind that politicians often lose sight of issues that aren’t in front of them all the time. They can end up ignoring even something like climate change, which is possibly the most pressing challenge of our time. So we all need to be bold. Attend a rally, write to your local leaders. If tens of millions of us just wrote to our leaders demanding action on the Arctic and climate change, well – that could change everything.

Please join me, and five million others so far. Visit www.savethearctic.org/emma

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union