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5 Crucial Lessons for the Left From Naomi Klein’s New Book | In These Times

circlingtheroundabout:

In her previous books The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (2007) and NO LOGO: No Space, No Choice, No Jobs (2000), Canadian author and activist Naomi Klein took on topics like neoliberal “shock therapy,” consumerism, globalization and “disaster capitalism,” extensively documenting the forces behind the dramatic rise in economic inequality and environmental degradation over the past 50 years. But in her new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate (due in stores September 16), Klein casts her gaze toward the future, arguing that the dangers of climate change demand radical action now to ward off catastrophe. She certainly isn’t alone in pointing out the urgency of the threat, but what sets Klein apart is her argument that it is capitalism—not carbon—that is at the root of climate change, inexorably driving us toward an environmental Armageddon in the pursuit of profit. This Changes Everything is well worth a read (or two) in full, but we’ve distilled some of its key points here.

Naomi Klein, one of my all-time favorite activists/journalists (and all-around brilliant person) is finally releasing her new book in September. My favorite Socialist rag In These Times got an exclusive look.

I can’t wait to read this one.

policymic:

Tracking US drone strikes? Now there’s an app for that

Last week, New York-based web developer Josh Begley answered that question with the launch of “MetaData+,” an iPhone app that sends an alert to your phone every time the United States conducts a drone strike.

He created the app in 2012 under the original name Drones+, but Apple rejected the app five times, taking nearly two years for the app to be available to the public.

The App Review Board claimed that Begley’s app was “not useful or entertaining enough” and something that “many audiences would find objectionable.”

Begley even spoke with a representative from Apple on the phone, who said that if the app was about drones, it just wasn’t going to be approved. Finally, after he removed the word “drone” from both the name and the description, the app was accepted.

Read more | Follow policymic

(Source: micdotcom)

lostdollsclub:

cartoonpolitics:

“The smart way to keep people passive and obedient is to strictly limit the spectrum of acceptable opinion, but allow very lively debate within that spectrum - even encourage the more critical and dissident views. That gives people the sense that there’s free thinking going on, while all the time the presuppositions of the system are being reinforced by the limits put on the range of the debate.” .. (Noam Chomsky)

NZ MSM already has made up most people’s minds.  I’ve never before really believed that they were biased, assuming that everyone thinks they’re biased anytime they say something that doesn’t confirm our own bias.  But OMF the last few months have made it so clear how the lead political writers for the NZ Herald at least, will be voting come September 20…

nprfreshair:

 "As a comedian you should not be in rooms where the people you’re making fun of also are because you’ll realize, at the end of the day, they’re just people. You can’t risk having that kind of compassion infect your mission to attack. My solution to that is not to curve my jokes — it’s to not put myself in the same room as the consequences of those jokes. … A comedian is supposed to be an outsider. He’s supposed to be outside looking in. I don’t want to be at parties in D.C. with politicians. Comedians shouldn’t be there. If you feel comfortable in a room like that, there’s a big problem. That’s what is so concerning when you see journalists so comfortable around politicians — that’s a red flag. There should be a kind of awkward tension whenever a journalist walks into a room that politicians are in, because you should’ve done things that annoyed them in the past. It’s the same as a comedian. You’re no one’s friend.”

- John Oliver, host of HBO’s Last Week Tonight and former correspondent for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart

The full interview with John Oliver is here, so check it out!
Photo by Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
ISO
160
Aperture
f/11
Exposure
1/100th
Focal Length
45mm

nprfreshair:

 
"As a comedian you should not be in rooms where the people you’re making fun of also are because you’ll realize, at the end of the day, they’re just people. You can’t risk having that kind of compassion infect your mission to attack. My solution to that is not to curve my jokes — it’s to not put myself in the same room as the consequences of those jokes. …
 
A comedian is supposed to be an outsider. He’s supposed to be outside looking in. I don’t want to be at parties in D.C. with politicians. Comedians shouldn’t be there. If you feel comfortable in a room like that, there’s a big problem. That’s what is so concerning when you see journalists so comfortable around politicians — that’s a red flag. There should be a kind of awkward tension whenever a journalist walks into a room that politicians are in, because you should’ve done things that annoyed them in the past. It’s the same as a comedian. You’re no one’s friend.”

- John Oliver, host of HBO’s Last Week Tonight and former correspondent for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart

The full interview with John Oliver is here, so check it out!

Photo by Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times

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