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Trees for Democracy

Unless we properly manage resources like forests, water, land, minerals and oil, we will not win the fight against poverty. And there will not be peace. Old conflicts will rage on and new resource wars will erupt unless we change the path we are on.

WANGARI MAATHAI, winner of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize and founder of the Green Belt Movement, writing in the New York Times (Dec. 10, 2004). Illustration by Leah Hayes.

halftheskymovement:

UN Women and the Government of the Netherlands convened with the Syrian women civil society members and activists in a two-day meeting to support women’s participation and voice in the Syrian peace process. The meeting ended with strong recommendations for upcoming peace talks, urging all parties to transcend their differences to reach an agreement for a free, pluralistic and democratic Syria that respects human rights and equality between men and women. 

Read more via UN Women.

The one-hundredth anniversary of 1914 should make us reflect anew on our vulnerability to human error, sudden catastrophes, and sheer accident. So we have good reason to glance over our shoulders even as we look ahead. History, said Mark Twain, never repeats itself but it rhymes. The past cannot provide us with clear blueprints for how to act, for it offers such a multitude of lessons that it leaves us free to pick and choose among them to suit our own political and ideological inclinations. Still, if we can see past our blinders and take note of the telling parallels between then and now, the ways in which our world resembles that of a hundred years ago, history does give us valuable warnings.

Margaret MacMillan, The Rhyme of History: Lessons of the Great War: The Brookings Essay

This is part of a very large web presentation by the Brookings Institution and definitely worth a look. The HTML-enhanced multimedia presentation, with graphics and videos, can be viewed here.

Margaret MacMillan is a professor of international history and a warden of St. Antony’s College, Oxford University. She also teaches at the University of Toronto, and has written several books related to early 20th Century history, particularly the period up to and just after World War I.

(via timekiller-s)
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